Andy’s veggie burgers

After a recent visit to McDonald’s, I thought I would test how good their veggie burger is by making my own.

The rear of the Imana Chakalaka soya mince gives an easy to follow recipe, although I pretty much did my own thing.

I added curry powder, dhania, cumin, mustard seeds, garlic, ginger and mixed herbs to rev up the flavour (buy from Spice Emporium for savings and a wide selection).

Onion rings were placed in between the raw patties; all on a glass casserole dish greased with olive oil.

My old faithful Weber was used to cook the patties using the indirect method.

Hickory wood chips were used to smoke flavour the patties with an artificial bacon flavour.

 

To finish off: Portuguese rolls, a slice of cheese, tomato, lettuce, low-fat salad dressing a good helping of Veri Peri of course!

My guinea pig in chief gave me an 8 out of 10 for effort and flavour, although I don’t think she has scored any previous meal higher than 7.

The patties tasted even better the next day!

Let’s haul out that rusty Weber

The Weber braai has been neglected for a few years now (he confesses with an embarrassed look on his face).

It was due time to give Timol a break and there was dead but fresh chicken laid out in the kitchen.

I vaguely recalled the “indirect method” of cooking.

The Weber site reveals:

“Indirect braaing is the right method for cooking thicker foods and anything that is likely to have burnt on the outside (surface) before it has had time to cook through to the middle. For example, cuts of meat over 5 centimetres in thickness or foods that are so delicate that direct exposure to the heat source would dry them out or scorch them. Also use this method for grilling with a rotisserie.

It is similar to roasting, but with the added benefits of that grilled texture, flavour and appearance you can’t get from an oven. Heat rises, reflects off the lid and inside surfaces of the grill, and slowly cooks the food evenly on all sides. The circulating heat works much like a convection oven, so there’s no need to turn the food.”

Now I would be lying if I told you exactly what I rubbed onto and into Mr Raw Skinless Chicken and some par-cooked potatoes on Sunday the 29th of July 2012, but it was something along the lines below:

  • Olive oil
  • Garlic
  • Rosemary (the herb)
  • Mixed herbs
  • Paprika
  • Black pepper

The chicken and potatoes were placed onto a baking tray, sealed with aluminium foil and dumped onto the grill (two trays of coal burning on either side of the tray). The lid was then placed on to cover the braai.

Photograph before sealing with foil

 

The Weber did its thing for about 45 minutes before I removed the foil to brown the top for another 20 minutes or so (don’t wait so long next time).

The final product, dished up in a casserole dish, is shown below