Miller’s Point

I clambered around the rocks at the southern end of Miller’s Point Cape Town, South Africa in the gusting cold winds to find a little nookie for my Canon G3X, Joby tripod and I a few minutes before sunrise.

It was one of those blessed “once in a blue moon” sunrises where I sat for some time after shooting and thought “Oh Wow!”.

The ocean lapped the shore, the birds were squawking about, golden light was about and I soaked up all Mother Nature had to offer. The Kogelberg Nature Reserve / mountains lay in the background.

F8, 1/30 sec. ISO 320 base image – 24-12-2016, 05h35

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Choose how you view your life.

You choose how you view your life… What you want to talk about and thereby give power to.

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Both photos are the same image taken on a drizzling overcast morning.

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Canon 6D, F 11, ISO 50, 0.5 sec & 3.5 sec blend

Remind us of God

“A glorious sunset, a beautiful flower, the delightful songs of happy birds, the silence of a moonlit night, the smile of a little child, the placid waters of a lake, wooded mountains, sweet music and devotional songs, a noble, generous act-all these elevate the mind, remind us of God and increase our faith” ~ Sri Swami Sivananda

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My Canon 6D, now decidedly jealous after seeing that the baby Canon G3X has been getting all the attention since purchase for 4 straight months now, begged me last night for a sunrise photo shoot.

The weather report promised partly cloudy to partly sunny and if true, this should have guaranteed a spectacular sunrise in the land of magic / Thompson’s Bay.

The upshot is that it was drizzling and the sun hardly showed this morning.

Despite it being lovely to get out and about while still dark and be on the ocean’s edge to witness the break of dawn, I was still hoping (desperately), all the way back to Durban, that I could at least retrieve one cool photo out of the grey and wet sunrise.

Well I’m happy with the attached result; the trip was overall really worthwhile.

The strange thing about driving to sunrise photo shoots early in the morning, especially the ones some distance from home, and the gaps in between shooting (if not socialising with others), is that one gets time to ponder about things.

My latest ponder was about people who incessantly preach and broadcast love and kindness but do little to act on it, and then those people who preach nothing but silently act out loving kindness.

I also thought that one can get quite lost in fervently preaching and advertising, and intentionally or unintentionally fail to act.

I also wondered about meditation and drawing closer to God if just for a short while.

Meditating on one’s breath is very challenging, and getting to and sitting inside some spiritual buildings have challenges of their own (for some of us only of course).

The reason for wondering about all of this was that I have again, like I often do, analysed the enhanced concentration that some can achieve in photography; especially landscape photography (shooting alone in a quiet venue usually at sunrise or sunset).

There are also moments, every blue moon or so, when the sun, moon, stars, clouds, wind, water, flowers, landscape and other things conspire as one to draw one’s mind (soul) into the moment, at which time an extreme feeling of gratitude and love can be felt by the witness.

So I guess that the trick is to find that one activity, where ever and whatever it may be, that helps pull your mind together, and generates feelings of gratitude and love.

Canon 6D, 30 sec. F16, ISO 50

Durban All in One

Good Day Durban!

I took a short stroll on the beach this morning at sunrise before work. It was not long before I was accosted by Prakash and Dave who were a little curious about my new Canon G3X “point & shoot” 😉.

Dave is a die-hard Canon man but Prakash tends to stray between Nikon, Fuji and some camera clubs 🙂.

We chatted to one of the boat crew who told us of very few fish and the ones that were caught were small, but lots of sewerage / waste being dumped from or out the harbour.

There was also mention of Chinese trawlers poaching in our waters. Everyone did their little bit to best try explain or guess why there are no fish when there should be.

It was then off to start the work day.

I was also told a tit-bit of information that reinforced the theory that times of extreme hardship in our lives can actually turn out to be huge blessings in disguise.

It obviously doesn’t feel like it at the time; it feels like living hell!

Yes, five years, or perhaps even shorter or longer, is a long time to wait but the benefits can be well worth it.

And yes the pain is unbearable at times, but again I say it can be well worth it.

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Canon G3X, F5.6, 1/250 sec, ISO 125, manual, handheld, RAW, +/- 200m North of Moyo on the Pier

5 Star Durban I Love Durban Durban Tourism Moses Mabhida StadiumPeoples park Moses Madiba Stadium FISHING DBN KZN Fishing

Good Morning Durban!

 Good Morning Durban!

“No one noticed and no one applauded. There was no recognition at all. No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before, Joshua Bell sold-out a theatre in Boston where the seats averaged $100 each to listen to him play the same music.

Joshua Bell, playing incognito in the D.C. underground station, was organised by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people’s priorities.

The experiment raised a number of questions most notably: If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made… How many other things are we missing as we rush through life?

Whilst the phrase Carpe Diem is a useful reminder to live each day fully, it’s not very practical since you can’t actually seize the day. What you can seize, however, is the moment. Life is a series of moments, and it’s the quality of each moment which determines the quality of our lives.

The revered psychologist Abraham Maslow said that each moment presents an opportunity, where we can either step forward into growth, or step back into safety. Whatever we decide to do with each moment, once it’s gone, it’s gone forever” ~ Sunil Bali

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