Tag Archives: roast

The Queen of England (off to see her)

On 3 November 2012 we were sure we could smell Turkey.

The plan was: a little stop in the UK on a farm, two weddings and then off to Istanbul.

On 16 November I disclosed that the visit to Turkey was “cold” and would just have to wait.

Despite this “setback”, Timol and I still had lots of fun in the few days on land and in air.

A little snack at Durban International Airport (King Shaka) was in order before we left.

I hadn’t been to Mugg & Bean in a while and was pleasantly surprised by what was served up and at a fair price.

 

I initially wasn’t going to eat but was soon tucking into everyone meals.

Didn’t have too much to eat as I was hoping to taste the yummy food on Emirates.

 

We were loaded up not too long after the air-hostesses who speak a multitude of languages.

I made sure that the meals were being loaded by Sky Chefs before I took my seat.

Up into the air we flew; bound for Dubai then the UK.

A good meal with some red wine helped settle us into the evening.

The selection of movies was vast and I had enough leg-room.

I watched three movies in a row before I got all “movied-out”.

Flying from Durban to India via Dubai on Emirates is OK, but the flight from Dubai to the UK (BHX) on this trip was a bit too long at 7 hours 50 min (Durban to Dubai is 8 hours 40 min). That’s over 16 hours of flying in a row.

I would rather fly direct next time thank you.

In the next post we will have a peep at the farm outside Birmingham where we stayed for one night.

And when I really get energetic, I will show some pics of London and the food inside Harrods.

I can smell (that) Turkey

By the same time tonight, Timol and I will be cruising at an altitude of 35000 ft on an exciting trip. It will also be dinner time.

The menu on Emirates should be something like this:

Chicken breast

Grilled chicken breast with caramelised plums, served in a cranberry reduction, accompanied with mashed potatoes, baby spinach and carrot slices

Lamb brochette

Fillet of lamb marinated in Arabic spices, combined with assorted peppers, charcoal grilled and served with a cinnamon scented sauce, accompanied with broccoli, roasted baby corn and steamed rice

Dessert

Sticky date pudding – A delicious dessert served with caramel sauce

Red Wine

Cecilia Faugerres Oak Aged

Now what’s this about “I can smell (that) Turkey”..?

Well, it’s not that we will be eating turkey but that we will soon be seeing:-

And before I forget, if you have the time, please have a look at some of Marc Bega’s photos of his home cooking direct from Tamarin, Mauritius.

I have given him this exposure as I really hope that he will soon also get a WordPress blog up and running to showcase his lovely dishes and photos.

PS – maybe encourage him with a few messages if you like what you see!

My first big stove

I have used a mini-stove since 1998. It is now 2012. Is that 14 years?

Timol after moving in soon “suggested” that a large conventional type stove would better suit her cooking style and needs.

Now, to avoid missing out on her next mutton curry, steamed fish, chutney chops, creamy beans curry, Marsala breakfast toast, bread and butter pudding, chicken curry… I thought it best to rush out immediately and invest in a brand new stove.

This was a frightening experience so I initially opted to only go one size up; to a large mini-stove.

However, the shopping experience got the better of me and I was soon eyeing out a sturdy black Defy 621.

As usual, I spent a lot of time trying to save a few Pounds, Dollars, Rands, Bucks.

I thought it was going to be a toss-up between Makro and Game, two major retailers.

Not to be!

Makro refused to budge on price and Game offered to beat any written quotation (by a measly ZAR 10).

I was not impressed at all. I mean, let’s face it – I was buying my first BIG stove and parting with my hard-earned money.

Luckily I then remembered Dave Ray in Sydney Road, Umbilo.

 

Before going to the store, I spoke to Kessie (031-2062038/9) about getting a “good deal”.

Kessie beat Game and Makro’s prices with ease!

Very smooth – no catch.

Unfortunately, when I arrived at the store I did not ask for Kessie and got sweet-talked by another salesman.

He gave me a good deal but I know Kessie would have done better.

 

The payment and loading at Dave Ray was quick, and it was not before long that the new stove was at home in the kitchen.

If I had purchased the stove from Game, then I would have had to pay at the store and drive a further 40 kilometres to the warehouse to collect. No thanks.

Now what to cook as the “first meal”…?

I opted for a lovely skinless chicken from Siraj Butchery in Stanley Copley Road. They are becoming really competitive on price and quality.

Some fresh garden herbs, olive oil, white wine, black pepper, lemon juice and whatever else tickled my fancy were gathered together.

 

Liquidized and then rubbed into the inside and outside of the chicken. Marinaded for about 6 hours.

 

Into the Defy oven.

 

Roasted to perfection.

 

Served with plain pasta (coated with light herbs, olive oil, pepper and salt).

 

Hints:

  1. If you need to buy appliances or lounge suites give Kessie a telephone call at Dave Ray. He will surely beat some of the major retailers in Durban on price and delivery
  2. Don’t cook the chicken too long and use tin foil to avoid it drying out
  3. Enjoy

Let’s haul out that rusty Weber

The Weber braai has been neglected for a few years now (he confesses with an embarrassed look on his face).

It was due time to give Timol a break and there was dead but fresh chicken laid out in the kitchen.

I vaguely recalled the “indirect method” of cooking.

The Weber site reveals:

“Indirect braaing is the right method for cooking thicker foods and anything that is likely to have burnt on the outside (surface) before it has had time to cook through to the middle. For example, cuts of meat over 5 centimetres in thickness or foods that are so delicate that direct exposure to the heat source would dry them out or scorch them. Also use this method for grilling with a rotisserie.

It is similar to roasting, but with the added benefits of that grilled texture, flavour and appearance you can’t get from an oven. Heat rises, reflects off the lid and inside surfaces of the grill, and slowly cooks the food evenly on all sides. The circulating heat works much like a convection oven, so there’s no need to turn the food.”

Now I would be lying if I told you exactly what I rubbed onto and into Mr Raw Skinless Chicken and some par-cooked potatoes on Sunday the 29th of July 2012, but it was something along the lines below:

  • Olive oil
  • Garlic
  • Rosemary (the herb)
  • Mixed herbs
  • Paprika
  • Black pepper

The chicken and potatoes were placed onto a baking tray, sealed with aluminium foil and dumped onto the grill (two trays of coal burning on either side of the tray). The lid was then placed on to cover the braai.

Photograph before sealing with foil

 

The Weber did its thing for about 45 minutes before I removed the foil to brown the top for another 20 minutes or so (don’t wait so long next time).

The final product, dished up in a casserole dish, is shown below