Tag Archives: Pondo

Amapondo Valley

When I can see it and action it I love to talk about it: Turning obstacles into opportunity, exercising patience and then taking the gap when it appears.

The day before New Year’s Eve… Task: drive 6 hours to do a job in Umtata E Cape. New Year’s Eve drive 6 hours to return home while some are cracking open their first beer.

Not the worst but I’m sure we would all rather be home at this time.

Solution: take camera with, don’t stay in Umtata rather Port St John’s on the sea and crack open a beer or two on the night before New Year’s Eve at a vibey backpacker spot called Amapondo Backpackers. Have a smashing meal with chilli and early night.

Sunrise next morning at 05:00: it’s raining. Solution: drive towards Durban at 05:00 and wait for the gap in the rain. Get out of car and take photo.

Benefits: what a smashing trip, job done sooner than later, pre-New Year’s mini-party (feeling like a backpacker), home in time for New Year’s party with two photos which remind me of the beautiful countryside I had to drive through.

Here is the first photo: Amapondo Valley

Canon South Africa 6D: F14, 1/40, ISO 320 using 17-40 available at Orms

Eastern Cape, South Africa

Amapondo Valley

Pondo Mornings

Pondo Mornings

Wikipedia “The Pondo or Phondo[1] are a Xhosa speaking ethnic group who have given their name to Pondoland, a sub-region comprising much of the northern seaboard of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The Pondo comprise several tribal groups, and after years of assimilation, are usually classed as a sub-group of the amaXhosa.

Their territory was annexed peacefully to the Cape Colony in 1884: missionary work had already begun in 1873 on the initiative of Henry Callaway, Bishop of St John’s Kaffraria.[2]

The Pondo Revolt (1960–1962) was the result of the resistance of the Pondo people against the implementation of the Bantu Authorities Act, part of the Apartheid legislation. Under the Apartheid ideology, separate development of the various ethnic groups of South Africa was proposed and part of that was to segregate black Africans into ‘homelands’ that were granted independence from South Africa.

Transkei was the homeland that incorporated all of Pondoland and its people, in addition to other Xhosa tribes such as the Gcaleka, in what used to be the eastern reaches of the then Cape Province”.