Durban Photo Exhibition

Please save this date and join me at my first ever photo exhibition at the trendy Side Bar part of Spiga d’oro Florida Road Durban.

Prints will be on sale for the opening night only at discounted prices.

There will be music and wine & pasta on sale as usual.

A lovely evening to be had by all.

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“Stay happy, good and true to yourself always, and savour every moment of life; it is very precious” ~ Margaret Harvard

Vetchie’s Reef

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“Your time to POP will soon come.

Did you know that Popcorns are normally fried in the same pot, in the same oil, at the same time and under the same heat conditions, but they do not all pop at the same time.

When flood comes, fish eat ants and when the flood recedes, ants eat fish.

Only time matters.

To make soap, oil is required. But to clean oil, soap is required. This is the irony of life. Everybody needs somebody at one point in time.

Do not despise or treat anyone with scorn. There is a time for everything and for everyone. Keep trusting and waiting on God.

Your time to POP will soon come” – Unknown (via Derek Gravett on Facebook)

Jacaranda Glenwood

This one stumps me time and time again: “Try to bear patiently with the faults of others as you also may have weaknesses which require the patience of others. See God in all beings. There is always some virtue and goodness in every person. By seeing only the good in others, we can help them to grow in virtue. Fault-finding is often the result of jealousy” ~Sri Swami Sivananda

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Jacaranda trees outside Manning Road Methodist Church – Che Guevara (Moore) Rd in Glenwood, Durban South Africa (tip given by Nola Mitchell).

Wat Arun Temple of Dawn at sunset

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Wiki: “Wat Arun Ratchawararam Ratchawaramahawihan or Wat Arun (Thai pronunciation: [wát ʔarun], “Temple of Dawn”) is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Bangkok Yai district of Bangkok, Thailand, on the Thonburi west bank of the Chao Phraya River. The temple derives its name from the Hindu god Aruna,[1] often personified as the radiations of the rising sun. Wat Arun is among the best known of Thailand’s landmarks and the first light of the morning reflects off the surface of the temple with pearly iridescence.[2] Although the temple had existed since at least the seventeenth century, its distinctive prang (spires) were built in the early nineteenth century during the reign of King Rama II. A Buddhist temple had existed at the site of Wat Arun since the time of the Ayutthaya Kingdom. It was then known as Wat Makok, after the village of Bang Makok in which it was situated. (Makok is the Thai name for the Spondias pinnata plant) According to the historian Prince Damrong Rajanubhab, the temple was shown in French maps during the reign of King Narai (1656–1688). The temple was renamed Wat Chaeng by King Taksin when he established his new capital of Thonburi near the temple, following the fall of Ayutthaya.[3] It is believed that Taksin vowed to restore the temple after passing it at dawn. The temple enshrined the Emerald Buddha image before it was transferred to Wat Phra Kaew on the river’s eastern bank in 1785.[4] The temple was located in grounds of the royal palace during Taksin’s reign, before his successor, Rama I, moved the palace to the other side of the river.[2] It was abandoned, for a long period of time, until Rama II, who restored the temple and extended the pagoda to 70m.[2]”

Canon 6D, F11, 2 sec, ISO 320, small Joby tripod

Wat Arun Bangkok

Harbour Lights

“It isn’t easy at first, but one of the greatest gifts you could ever give someone who makes your heart soar is the freedom to learn their own lessons, at their own pace. Even trickier is discovering that one of the greatest gifts you could ever give someone who gets on your nerves is the freedom to learn their own lessons, at their own pace. And perhaps most challenging of all is understanding that one of the greatest gifts you could ever give yourself is the realization that your heart soaring and your nerves fraying have never been dependent upon other people and their lessons” ~ The Universe

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Fort Cochin

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“India has always had a strange way with her conquerors. In defeat, she beckons them in, then slowly seduces, assimilates and transforms them.” ~ William Dalrymple, White Mughals: Love and Betrayal in Eighteenth-Century India

The dusty, tarred and paved alleys / roads of Fort Cochin especially in and closer to the old town / harbour entrance can be explored at a leisurely pace for hours on end. On my first visit I ended up getting lost and walking with a heavy backpack for an extra few kilometres. Some great little snack bars and restaurants can be found in this area, which is mostly alcohol free (I did find one official bar doing limited sales). Late afternoon through the road network ending with an ice-cream is a must-do. Morning walks are also great and present some lovely photo opportunities with golden rays striking through the alleys and trees. Think… relaxing lazy days, market buzz in the distance, dogs napping nearby, the odd fly buzzing around and crows waiting for a titbit: I love India! Further along the dusty, tarred and paved alleys / roads of Fort Cochin is the promenade where people gather at the waterfront to exercise, socialise and or just watch the sun go down. I said earlier that Fort Cochin could be described as the cutest little town I have discovered this far in India; it’s maybe also the most “innocent”. The photo below is of two bicycles parked off while their owners watch the sun slowly go down. A gent is seen reading in the background with two passers-by heading along the dusty sand pathway.

Canon South Africa 6D, F4, 1/250 sec, ISO 320