Spice Emporium

“Emporium” (medieval Latin from Greek emporos = ‘merchant’) is a term used for a store selling a wide variety of goods, and for marketplaces or trading centres in ancient cities (see emporia (ancient Greece) and emporia (early medieval).

Situated but a stone throw away from Durban’s Beachfront, standing proudly in a sturdy spacious building, we have Spice Emporium.

 

Spice Emporium was born 20 years ago as an ethnic food store and since its inception, has been world renowned for its ability to provide the complete Indian experience. The brand has become synonymous with quality and exclusivity across the entire market and as a result the flagship store has become a landmark tourist destination.

There is ample parking on the street and car guards who take their job seriously.

 

The store also offers limited off-road parking.

 

Smart and alert security guards watch over the goings-on inside and outside the store.

 

The only thing that you can get away with and steal here is a VERY GOOD DEAL!

So with the advent of the Puratassi fasting period from 17th September till the 17th of October, where else to go and stock up on essentials but Spice Emporium of course.

Read more about Puratassi here.

The store has such a wide variety of goodies and at super competitive prices.

From the image below nobody will doubt that Timol and I quickly put 4kg of kidney beans into our trolley earlier today.

Don’t kid yourself with the words “Indian experience” above. Yes, there are Indian spices but also a wide range of dried herbs, peppercorns, flour and so on. The list is endless.

 

They also have cook and kitchenware.

 

A wide variety of incense.

 

Assortment of cool-drinks and juices.

 

Frozen veggies, pastries, soya products.

 

Cookies and sauces.

 

Honey, oils, prayer goodies.

 

Happy customers and more prayer goodies.

 

Ample space to move around lots of rows of goodies with store supplied trolleys.

 

Disco mukwas and somph (saunf) sweets.

Wide variety of rices and more pots.

A beautiful display of colour and variety.

 

More tasty treats.

 

And finally the really tasty mixtures; blends of India.

A very long row of everything.

 

Even a blend for the potjie pot.

 

An interesting onion & rice mix.

 

And even some help for those who want to try their hand at Indian Delights.

 

Now all this looking in-store is certainly energy consuming.

 

So why not stop off at the Chaat Shop.

Snacks for all to eat.

 

A spacious dining area.

 

A vibey kitchen where good hygiene is obviously not-negotiable.

 

Fresh ingredients only.

 

As a retailer based in Durban, the primary focus of the business has always been to service the retail market. With the increased influence of “Bollywood” and the increase in awareness of South Africans of Indian origin to become aware of their roots, the business has seen tremendous growth. However, the growth of the business cannot solely be attributed to these influences. Spice Emporium is a family run business and the growth of the business can also be attributed to the personal touch of the husband and wife team that manage Spice Emporium. Customers are not viewed as customers rather as friends and it is this personal attention and value to customers that have attributed to the growth of Spice Emporium.

Spice Emporium is managed by Vinod Harie and his wife Chandrika, whom between them have over 50 years of experience. Spice Emporium was born from the vision of Vinod who noticed that there was a niche in the market for a high quality, speciality and ethnic food store.

Timol and I met Chandrika earlier today.

She is delightful and friendly and I am sure she will, if not in a meeting or doing something else to keep this grand emporium on track, find the time to meet you in the aisles with her smiley face.

Call +27 31 332 5888 or go to the world of Spice Emporium where you get World Food with Home Flavour.

The flagship store is situated at 31 Monty Naicker Street towards the beach in Durban City Centre.

There are two branches: one at Gateway Theatre of Shopping, a premier shopping centre in the heart of the new Umhlanga Town Centre, about 30 kms north of the Durban CBD, and at the Reservoir Hills Mall on Mountbatten Drive, Reservoir Hills.

Go pay them a visit, you will be greatly surprised at what you will find!

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Let’s haul out that rusty Weber

The Weber braai has been neglected for a few years now (he confesses with an embarrassed look on his face).

It was due time to give Timol a break and there was dead but fresh chicken laid out in the kitchen.

I vaguely recalled the “indirect method” of cooking.

The Weber site reveals:

“Indirect braaing is the right method for cooking thicker foods and anything that is likely to have burnt on the outside (surface) before it has had time to cook through to the middle. For example, cuts of meat over 5 centimetres in thickness or foods that are so delicate that direct exposure to the heat source would dry them out or scorch them. Also use this method for grilling with a rotisserie.

It is similar to roasting, but with the added benefits of that grilled texture, flavour and appearance you can’t get from an oven. Heat rises, reflects off the lid and inside surfaces of the grill, and slowly cooks the food evenly on all sides. The circulating heat works much like a convection oven, so there’s no need to turn the food.”

Now I would be lying if I told you exactly what I rubbed onto and into Mr Raw Skinless Chicken and some par-cooked potatoes on Sunday the 29th of July 2012, but it was something along the lines below:

  • Olive oil
  • Garlic
  • Rosemary (the herb)
  • Mixed herbs
  • Paprika
  • Black pepper

The chicken and potatoes were placed onto a baking tray, sealed with aluminium foil and dumped onto the grill (two trays of coal burning on either side of the tray). The lid was then placed on to cover the braai.

Photograph before sealing with foil

 

The Weber did its thing for about 45 minutes before I removed the foil to brown the top for another 20 minutes or so (don’t wait so long next time).

The final product, dished up in a casserole dish, is shown below