Tag Archives: eat

Daruma Authentic Japanese Restaurant 2

2 (7) (Large)

We visited Daruma in Durban a few weeks ago and had such fun!

I only had my Blackberry available so the photos are of an inferior quality. I managed to rework them a little.

The visit prompted us to buy soya sauce, remove the dust off our wok and whip up two stir fry dishes in quick succession. I think this habit will stay around for a long time.

Sitting around the teppanyaki sipping on sake and white wine until the food was ready, and then using chopsticks to eat is something we want to do again in a hurry.

Wikipedia reveals: “Teppanyaki (鉄板焼き teppan-yaki) is a style of Japanese cuisine that uses an iron griddle to cook food. The word teppanyaki is derived from teppan (鉄板), which means iron plate, and yaki (焼き), which means grilled, broiled or pan-fried. In Japan, teppanyaki refers to dishes cooked using an iron plate, including steak, shrimp, okonomiyaki, yakisoba, and monjayaki.

Modern teppanyaki grills are typically propane-heated flat surface grills, and are widely used to cook food in front of guests at restaurants. Teppanyaki grills are commonly confused with the hibachi barbecue grill, which has a charcoal or gas flame and is made with an open grate design.[1] With a solid griddle type cook surface, the teppanyaki is more suitable for smaller ingredients, such as rice, egg, and finely chopped vegetables.

Sake (/ˈsɑːkeɪ/ or /ˈsɑːki/)[1][2] is an alcoholic beverage of Japanese origin that is made from fermented rice. It may also be spelled saké. In the Japanese language, the word sake refers to Japanese liquor, while the beverage called sake in English is termed nihonshu (日本酒, “Japanese liquor”).

Sake is sometimes referred to in English-speaking countries as rice wine. However, unlike wine, in which alcohol is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in grapes and other fruits, sake is produced by means of a brewing process more like that of beer. To make beer or sake, the sugar needed to produce alcohol must first be converted from starch.

The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer, in that for beer, the conversion from starch to sugar and from sugar to alcohol occurs in two discrete steps. But when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously.

Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer. Wine generally contains 9%–16% ABV,[3] while most beer contains 3%–9%, and undiluted sake contains 18%–20% (although this is often lowered to about 15% by diluting with water prior to bottling).”

2 (1) (Large) 2 (2) (Large) 2 (3) (Large) 2 (5) (Large) 2 (6) (Large) 2 (8) (Large) 2 (9) (Large) 2 (10) (Large) 2 (11) (Large) 2 (12) (Large) 2 (13) (Large)

Daruma Authentic Japanese Restaurant 1

1 (3) (Large)

We visited Daruma in Durban a few weeks ago and had such fun!

I only had my Blackberry available so the photos are of an inferior quality. I managed to rework them a little.

The visit prompted us to buy soya sauce, remove the dust off our wok and whip up two stir fry dishes in quick succession. I think this habit will stay around for a long time.

 

Sitting around the teppanyaki sipping on sake and white wine until the food was ready, and then using chopsticks to eat is something we want to do again in a hurry.

Wikipedia reveals: “Teppanyaki (鉄板焼き teppan-yaki) is a style of Japanese cuisine that uses an iron griddle to cook food. The word teppanyaki is derived from teppan (鉄板), which means iron plate, and yaki (焼き), which means grilled, broiled or pan-fried. In Japan, teppanyaki refers to dishes cooked using an iron plate, including steak, shrimp, okonomiyaki, yakisoba, and monjayaki.

Modern teppanyaki grills are typically propane-heated flat surface grills, and are widely used to cook food in front of guests at restaurants. Teppanyaki grills are commonly confused with the hibachi barbecue grill, which has a charcoal or gas flame and is made with an open grate design.[1] With a solid griddle type cook surface, the teppanyaki is more suitable for smaller ingredients, such as rice, egg, and finely chopped vegetables.

Sake (/ˈsɑːkeɪ/ or /ˈsɑːki/)[1][2] is an alcoholic beverage of Japanese origin that is made from fermented rice. It may also be spelled saké. In the Japanese language, the word sake refers to Japanese liquor, while the beverage called sake in English is termed nihonshu (日本酒, “Japanese liquor”).

Sake is sometimes referred to in English-speaking countries as rice wine. However, unlike wine, in which alcohol is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in grapes and other fruits, sake is produced by means of a brewing process more like that of beer. To make beer or sake, the sugar needed to produce alcohol must first be converted from starch.

The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer, in that for beer, the conversion from starch to sugar and from sugar to alcohol occurs in two discrete steps. But when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously.

Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer. Wine generally contains 9%–16% ABV,[3] while most beer contains 3%–9%, and undiluted sake contains 18%–20% (although this is often lowered to about 15% by diluting with water prior to bottling).”

1 (1) (Large) 1 (2) (Large) 1 (4) (Large) 1 (5) (Large) 1 (6) (Large) 1 (7) (Large) 1 (8) (Large) 1 (9) (Large) 1 (10) (Large) 1 (11) (Large) 1 (12) (Large)

 

Andy’s Home-made Pizza

What do you do when your local pizza outlet starts charging you exorbitant prices like a vendor trying to keep the Italian Mafioso and his own wife happy?

I’ll tell you. You take matters into your own hands.

I bought some frozen pizza bases, mushrooms, green peppers, cheese, onion, mince, smoked chicken, chilli and headed home. I then hauled even more ingredients (like garlic) out of the cupboard and fridge.

All got chopped up and loaded or sprinkled, as the family ordered (some were veg-fasting), onto the pizza bases and thrown into the oven at 220 degrees centigrade for about 25 minutes.

The photos below were taken before the oven stage.

We added Veri-Peri sauce before eating.

Andy pizza (Large) Andy pizza close (Large)

 

 

 

Timol’s chicken curry

Who remembers Timol’s bean chutney?

Her last two chicken curries have really shot tongues out, caused a ruckus and had crowds diving in for thirds.

The second version shown below was a defrosted chicken that escaped getting roasted but that ended up getting spiced-up.

We enjoyed the dish with a selection of roti, rice or bread.

IMG_6335.CR2 (Large) IMG_6331.CR2 (Large)

 

I can’t give you Timol’s recipe – it’s a family secret (not).

You could look at Anjum’s recipe if you need a hint or two.

Why we love Durban: Victoria Street Market – 5

This post follows Why we love Durban: Moses Mabhida – 4.

Where to stay advises of the following:

Durban’s Victoria Street Market is a vast oriental bizarre with hundreds of stalls offering a huge selection of spices, fabrics, baskets, beads, sculptures, soap-stones and other African curios.

It is a favourite tourist destination as it offers not only great prices, but a unique chance to experience the atmosphere of an oriental marketplace where haggling is considered the norm.

The market is located at the corner of Queen St. and Victoria St. and has plenty of underground parking“.

There is a general section for all and fish / poultry / offal section (not for the meek). Traders on the roadside sell vegetables.

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (2).tif (Medium)

Ulwazi, as always, provides a wealth of information:

The Victoria street market in Durban is a rich historical site that reflects the struggles of a poor community striving for their own identity and a burning need to make ends to meet to survive in new pasture market currently stands strong in the central business district of Durban, and is an epic in the Indian community as it serves as a reminder of a disadvantaged community that was determined to survive against all odds.

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (5).tif (Medium)

 

The market was a seed sown by the Indian indentured labourers that had completed their indenture ship and had a choice of either going back to India, or to seek employment, or create their own means employment.

The market was seen as transition from farming to industrial employment. Having experience from an agricultural sector their best option to survive was growing fruit and vegetables and selling them on the streets of Durban.

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (1).tif (Medium)

Initially they used the Grey Street Mosque to trade but as the number of traders grew from both Hindu and Muslim backgrounds they moved to the streets. The atmosphere was a buzzing environment of a rush, with horse drawn carts and people sitting on the streets of Durban, attracting potential customers. They had to pay a daily rental fee to Durban town council and because it was unaffordable to travel back and forth from home they were forced to sleep on the pavements or seek shelters at a nearby temples.

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (14).tif (Medium)

 

A typical market day started at 4am and ended at 6pm. Farmers reached the market as early as 2 am to secure a trading place. There was no access to toilets and there was no protection from extreme weather conditions.

In 1910, the Indian market was formally built by the municipal in Victoria Street it was also known as the Top Market or Squatter Market. The traders also sold groceries, fish, spices and crafts as part of their trade.

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (9) (Medium).tif

The traders also experienced conflicts amongst themselves as the squatters on the street was seen as a hindrance to the stall holders inside the building complaining the squatters was causing pollution and was a threat to their sales.

In 1934, the Durban Town Council prohibited the sale of cooked food to accommodate restaurants in the market building.

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (13).tif (Medium)

The squatter traders were members of the Indian Agricultural Association, Natal Farm Association and from the towns of Springfield, Newlands and Clairwood it was a business hub, but the traders were seen as a threat as they were selling cheaper commodities that meant other business were running losses.

The squatters also caused traffic congestion, and they were also destroying the cemetery that were near them. The Durban Town Council built a wall which the squatter traders had to pay the costs of.

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (6).tif (Medium)

In 1970, the Durban City Council were set to build a freeway across the market which was opposed by the traders who protested, however in 1973 a fire destroyed the market and although the reason behind the fire was a drunk street man, the traders viewed it as a sabotage.

The market was reconstructed and its still thriving strong as ever with a blend of Indian spices and African craft.”

20121231_vic str_tonemapped (10).tif (Medium)

 

 

The best & biggest beef burger in Durban

This morning, before our motorcycle ride, I said to my friend “I really feel like a big juicy & tasty beef burger”.

We went looking and I can now share a quick bit of valuable information about where to find the best & biggest beef burger in Durban (B&BBB).

I really fell compelled to share as I nearly fell off my chair today (shouting “wow!” a number of times) when the waitress brought the B&BBB (value for money) to our table.

It had colour, it was fresh (meat & other ingredients) and it tasted superb (I didn’t even have to add the usual chilli sauce). My friend and a couple of other patrons were hugely impressed with what they saw. The word “whopper” was used.

After eating the B&BBB, I went home for a lovely 2 hour power-nap; content knowing that breakfast lunch and dinner were now all taken care of in one foul swoop.

Although I only have a number of low quality Blackberry photos to get my point across; I believe they are of sufficient quality for you to be the judge.

I have photos of two major & well-known food outlets (Wimpy & Spur whose online photos look so lovely), as well as a contender from North Durban in Umhlanga: The George.

The George doesn’t seem to have a nice website with photos, but I’m sure the owner will soon let me know if there is one.

Not included in the “best & biggest beef burger in Durban” competition are Mc Donalds, Steers, Beach Bums (a very strong contender, if not 2nd place) and a few other joints.

You be the judge and be sure to let me know your verdict!

Wimpy
Wimpy
The George
The George
The George
The George
The George
The George
Spur
Spur
The George
The George
The George
The George

Spice Emporium

“Emporium” (medieval Latin from Greek emporos = ‘merchant’) is a term used for a store selling a wide variety of goods, and for marketplaces or trading centres in ancient cities (see emporia (ancient Greece) and emporia (early medieval).

Situated but a stone throw away from Durban’s Beachfront, standing proudly in a sturdy spacious building, we have Spice Emporium.

 

Spice Emporium was born 20 years ago as an ethnic food store and since its inception, has been world renowned for its ability to provide the complete Indian experience. The brand has become synonymous with quality and exclusivity across the entire market and as a result the flagship store has become a landmark tourist destination.

There is ample parking on the street and car guards who take their job seriously.

 

The store also offers limited off-road parking.

 

Smart and alert security guards watch over the goings-on inside and outside the store.

 

The only thing that you can get away with and steal here is a VERY GOOD DEAL!

So with the advent of the Puratassi fasting period from 17th September till the 17th of October, where else to go and stock up on essentials but Spice Emporium of course.

Read more about Puratassi here.

The store has such a wide variety of goodies and at super competitive prices.

From the image below nobody will doubt that Timol and I quickly put 4kg of kidney beans into our trolley earlier today.

Don’t kid yourself with the words “Indian experience” above. Yes, there are Indian spices but also a wide range of dried herbs, peppercorns, flour and so on. The list is endless.

 

They also have cook and kitchenware.

 

A wide variety of incense.

 

Assortment of cool-drinks and juices.

 

Frozen veggies, pastries, soya products.

 

Cookies and sauces.

 

Honey, oils, prayer goodies.

 

Happy customers and more prayer goodies.

 

Ample space to move around lots of rows of goodies with store supplied trolleys.

 

Disco mukwas and somph (saunf) sweets.

Wide variety of rices and more pots.

A beautiful display of colour and variety.

 

More tasty treats.

 

And finally the really tasty mixtures; blends of India.

A very long row of everything.

 

Even a blend for the potjie pot.

 

An interesting onion & rice mix.

 

And even some help for those who want to try their hand at Indian Delights.

 

Now all this looking in-store is certainly energy consuming.

 

So why not stop off at the Chaat Shop.

Snacks for all to eat.

 

A spacious dining area.

 

A vibey kitchen where good hygiene is obviously not-negotiable.

 

Fresh ingredients only.

 

As a retailer based in Durban, the primary focus of the business has always been to service the retail market. With the increased influence of “Bollywood” and the increase in awareness of South Africans of Indian origin to become aware of their roots, the business has seen tremendous growth. However, the growth of the business cannot solely be attributed to these influences. Spice Emporium is a family run business and the growth of the business can also be attributed to the personal touch of the husband and wife team that manage Spice Emporium. Customers are not viewed as customers rather as friends and it is this personal attention and value to customers that have attributed to the growth of Spice Emporium.

Spice Emporium is managed by Vinod Harie and his wife Chandrika, whom between them have over 50 years of experience. Spice Emporium was born from the vision of Vinod who noticed that there was a niche in the market for a high quality, speciality and ethnic food store.

Timol and I met Chandrika earlier today.

She is delightful and friendly and I am sure she will, if not in a meeting or doing something else to keep this grand emporium on track, find the time to meet you in the aisles with her smiley face.

Call +27 31 332 5888 or go to the world of Spice Emporium where you get World Food with Home Flavour.

The flagship store is situated at 31 Monty Naicker Street towards the beach in Durban City Centre.

There are two branches: one at Gateway Theatre of Shopping, a premier shopping centre in the heart of the new Umhlanga Town Centre, about 30 kms north of the Durban CBD, and at the Reservoir Hills Mall on Mountbatten Drive, Reservoir Hills.

Go pay them a visit, you will be greatly surprised at what you will find!