Tag Archives: Dundee

There is Hope

Dundee Hope

“No matter how far you might think you have come from grace, your connection to Spirit is always right there, right at your centre. All you have to do is remember it.” – Luitha K. Tamaya

In the past few months I have opportunity to drive through Tugela Ferry in KZN and then through Dundee. The drive there is very scenic and beautiful. The Ferry and surrounding area has been the location of many fierce battles and clashes amongst the locals throughout its history, as far as I know.

Lately, the area seems very peaceful (or at least it looks that way), but there is certainly another silent battle going on. I was taken aback upon entering Dundee at the number of funeral parlours that almost seem to be on every street in the CBD. I would challenge anyone to show me the same concentration of parlours in say Durban, Cape Town or JHB. My facts may be a little skewed or very accurate, but something is not well.

On a positive note – I hauled my Canon 550D along on the trip instead of my master-blaster 6D. The accompanying photo was taken on the outskirts of Dundee at sunrise. The ground was frosted over and there was a little mist about in pockets here and there. It was amazing!

The 550D battled with the low light in places although I admittedly stretched the RAW image past it accepted capabilities. This resulted in noise which I mostly cancelled out.

550D settings F 9, 1/400 sec, ISO 100 using 24/105L @ 35mm

Watching over the valley

Valley Watcher

Ever since I saw Carl Jason Smorenburg ‘s recent photo, I’ve been wanting to get my own photo of an aloe. I pulled over on the R34 outside Vryheid, hopped a fence and snapped this proud aloe. Next, I want a similar photo but with the sun coming up.

Canon 6D, 17/40mm, F9, 1/25 sec, ISO 320

The bitter aloe is most famous for its medicinal qualities, provided by the golden-brown sap of the leaves. The long, tapering leaves are green, sometimes with a slightly blue or reddish tinge, and bear sharp, brown teeth on the margins, and sometimes also on the surface of the leaf. Indeed, the scientific name of this species alludes to the prickly leaves, as ferox means ‘fierce’ in Latin. The leaves are arranged in a rosette, and as the leaves age and die, they remain attached to the plant, forming a ‘petticoat’ of dried leaves around the base of the stem. The flowers of the bitter aloe vary in colour from red to orange and yellow, and occasionally white, and are borne on spike-like heads.” ~ http://www.arkive.org/ — at Vryheid KZN

 

Aloe

Vryheid Aloe

Ever since I saw Carl Jason Smorenburg ‘s recent photo, I’ve been wanting to get my own photo of an aloe. I pulled over on the R34 outside Vryheid, hopped a fence and snapped this proud aloe. Next, I want a similar photo but with the sun coming up 🙂

Canon 6D, 17/40mm, F9, 1/25 sec, ISO 320

The bitter aloe is most famous for its medicinal qualities, provided by the golden-brown sap of the leaves. The long, tapering leaves are green, sometimes with a slightly blue or reddish tinge, and bear sharp, brown teeth on the margins, and sometimes also on the surface of the leaf. Indeed, the scientific name of this species alludes to the prickly leaves, as ferox means ‘fierce’ in Latin. The leaves are arranged in a rosette, and as the leaves age and die, they remain attached to the plant, forming a ‘petticoat’ of dried leaves around the base of the stem. The flowers of the bitter aloe vary in colour from red to orange and yellow, and occasionally white, and are borne on spike-like heads.” ~ http://www.arkive.org/