Hello South Africa

“All life demands struggle. Those who have everything given to them become lazy, selfish, and insensitive to the real values of life. The very striving and hard work that we so constantly try to avoid is the major building block in the person we are today” ~ Pope Paul VI

Car Guard North Beach (Large)

Durban is warmer than most of SA but it was a slightly breezy 12 degrees C or so this morning before and shortly after sunrise. The dogs were shivering on the back of the LDV while we toured the yacht mole and beachfront. It was chilly! Perhaps the wind-chill made it 9 degrees C or so.

The street persons certainly had it hard last night and were mostly still frozen up and hidden in old blankets on cardboard mattresses in their usual hooks and crannies. By sunrise most of the street persons in the yacht mole are up and about; this morning it was cold and “sleep-in” time.

On our trip and some of the way home we drove past a few IOL newspaper headline signs at intersections revealing that the “guest house owner” still refused to apologise. This is the first and only such guest house owner I have come across in years that has an “alternative” opinion like this. In my regular travels to Pongola, Newcastle, Umtata and a week stint in Bloemfontein, I shared guest houses with persons of all walks of life; they were happy, I was happy and the guest house owners were happy.

I thought about the huge countrywide interest and energy being generated on this “Sodwana” subject and what was important to me, but then soon got back into the present as I got close to home.

The sun had risen higher by this time and a few of the regular raggedy street children had started to gather at the intersection near my home to beg for scraps of food and a few Rand. I thought about the opportunities available to them and when (if) they might move up the food chain or be forced into crime… By then I was home.

This morning’s pondering highlighted a photo for me that I had taken a few days back of a car guard who I met some weeks back. I told him I would return with my new camera, which I later did. He was keen for a few shots but his eyes kept darting towards the cars he had undertaken to guard.

He’s an eager energetic chap with enthusiasm for his work; beautiful stuff indeed.

Canon G3X, F5.6, ISO 320, 1/125 sec. Handheld.

Zoomed in from afar with +0.7 exp.comp. Nil flash.

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Helping Others

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“Always try your best to utilise your energy, your intellect, your education, your wealth, your strength, or anything that you possess, for the betterment of those who are lowly placed in life, and for society in general. You will thus expand your heart and enjoy everlasting peace, bliss and satisfaction” – Sri Swami Sivananda

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Tony

Web Prepared

“Beauty is not in the face; beauty is a light in the heart” – Kahlil Gibran

The dogs and I ambled down to the harbour this morning (10 Oct 2015); armed only with my Samsung South Africa Samsung Mobile Samsung Galaxy Note 4. I got chatting to this happy gent and we did a little photo shoot (background replaced as it was a little dreary at sunrise). His real name is Perry.

‪#‎samsung‬ ‪#‎samsungmobile‬ ‪#‎note4‬ Samsung Mobile India Samsung Mobile USA

Freedom Day South Africa 2015

“For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. To deny people their human rights is to challenge their very humanity.” ~ Nelson Mandela

With xenophobia crushed and our government ministers, all free of wrongdoing, doing their utmost best to lift the lives of others (not their own), I wished all a happy freedom day on 27 April 2015.

Street Sunrise

Canon South Africa​ 6D from Orms​, Canon EF 17–40mm lens​, F10, 1/40, ISO 320

#freedom #freedomday #xenophobia #corruption #madiba #nelsonmandela

India 2014: Two Faces of India

It’s been two months since we returned from India and the last five weeks or more have seen very little of the multiple photos that I took. I suppose what sparked my interest on Thursday, 12 February 2015 was a chat I had was a local/South African Indian businessman who was off to Dubai and Malaysia. I asked him if he had ever been to India and was sure I knew the answer before he gave it. He replied in the negative confirming my suspicions.

I asked him why he had never visited India, the country of his roots, and he told me what a number of other local persons have told me “It is very dirty and poverty stricken isn’t it?” Once again I went to great lengths to explain all sides of the coin as I know best from having visited India on three occasions during the past six years or so.

The first photo that caught my eye, one I have previously presented, was taken at night in Colaba outside Leopold Café. I named this photo “Blue Nights”. In this photo a mother or perhaps grandmother is seen holding a young child and asking for money.

On two occasions whilst walking on the streets during the day, we were approached by a mother with a young child who pointed at a nearby store and tried to convince us that she did not want money but baby food from the store. She followed us into the store and the shop owner even confirmed her story to be true.

Blue Nights

 

We suspected that this was a ploy to relieve us of our money, a portion of which would be returned to the mother once we left the shop and the shop owner would keep his cut. Of course our suspicions could be very wrong.

The second photo that grabbed my attention the next evening was taken early morning shortly after sunrise on the side of a canal on the Kerala Backwaters.

The green rice fields of prominent in the photo and the large long backwater canal is out of the picture, raised a metre or two above the rice field, to the left.

Kerala Dawn

The two photographs are collectively called “Two Faces of India”, but should perhaps be called two of many faces of India.