Bangkok

Web Prepared (Large)

“Bangkok (English pronunciation: /ˈbæŋkɒk/[5]) is the capital and most populous city of Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon (กรุงเทพมหานคร, pronounced [krūŋ tʰêːp mahǎː nákʰɔ̄ːn] ( listen)) or simply About this sound Krung Thep (help·info). The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in Central Thailand, and has a population of over 8 million, or 12.6 percent of the country’s population. Over 14 million people (22.2 percent) live within the surrounding Bangkok Metropolitan Region, making Bangkok an extreme primate city, dwarfing Thailand’s other urban centres in terms of importance.
Bangkok traces its roots to a small trading post during the Ayutthaya Kingdom in the 15th century, which eventually grew in size and became the site of two capital cities: Thonburi in 1768 and Rattanakosin in 1782. Bangkok was at the heart of Siam’s (as Thailand used to be known) modernization, during the later 19th century, as the country faced pressures from the West. The city was the centre of Thailand’s political struggles, throughout the 20th century, as the country abolished absolute monarchy, adopted constitutional rule and underwent numerous coups and several uprisings. The city grew rapidly during the 1960s through the 1980s and now exerts a significant impact among Thailand’s politics, economy, education, media and modern society.
The Asian investment boom in the 1980s and 1990s led many multinational corporations to locate their regional headquarters in Bangkok. The city is now a major regional force in finance and business. It is an international hub for transport and health care, and has emerged as a regional centre for the arts, fashion and entertainment. The city is well known for its vibrant street life and cultural landmarks, as well as its notorious red-light districts. The historic Grand Palace and Buddhist temples including Wat Arun and Wat Pho stand in contrast with other tourist attractions such as the nightlife scenes of Khaosan Road and Patpong. Bangkok is among the world’s top tourist destinations. It is named the most visited city in MasterCard’s Global Destination Cities Index, and was named “World’s Best City” for four consecutive years by Travel + Leisure magazine.
Bangkok’s rapid growth amidst little urban planning and regulation has resulted in a haphazard cityscape and inadequate infrastructure systems. Limited roads, despite an extensive expressway network, together with substantial private car usage, have resulted in chronic and crippling traffic congestion. This in turn caused severe air pollution in the 1990s. The city has since turned to public transport in an attempt to solve this major problem. Four rapid transit lines are now in operation, with more systems under construction or planned by the national government and the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration.” ~ Wikipedia
Canon 6D, 24-105 mm, F10, 1/160 sec handheld, ISO 100 taken from Mercure Ibis Hotel roof top.

I am Durban 031 ZA

“Everybody’s looking for the “ultimate way”. But the thing is, the “ultimate way” for each person is going to be different. That’s why we have all these wars going on between people. This diet is the best, you should have kids, you should have a big wedding, you should do this type of exercise, you should drive this type of car. No. Look within first. Discover what you value, what’s important to you and that will become your “ultimate way”. Other people will have different ways and that’s OK. That’s for them. Your ultimate way is truly your ultimate way.” ~ Brian Kim

i-am-durban-031za (Large).jpg

Canon South Africa 550D, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Lens, F7.1, ISO 800, AV, speeds 1/800 – slightly slower sec, handheld, 4 portrait images stitched in PS. Location: Wilson’s Wharf Durban, South Africa. Saturday 2 May 2015 at 06:47. I’ll say it again: the 550 and 50mm 1.8 is a really entry-level kit but it continues to surprise me.

Anyway, it’s time for breakfast. I think KuDta On Wilsons Wharf will be a good bet at ZAR 22 for 2 eggs, bacon/macon, 1 toast, chips & coffee. One of my photos is on their wall as wallpaper – I think this photo “I am Durban 031ZA” would look far better wink emoticon. The TIF file is a healthy 800MB and it’s sharp!

I Love Durban 5 Star Durban Celebrate Durban! Show Me Durban
What’s on Durban Kudta

What you think

“It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it” – Dale Carnegie
Durban Delights

This is my second photo from my recent visit to Durban Harbour. I prefer it to the first but can see that I have a third one which may topple the first two (holding thumbs). The “story” from the first post is included below:

“When we were youngsters, we would fish overnight and / or the entire day at Durban Yacht Mole in the harbour. When the tide was out, we would walk the sandbanks fishing off the edges. As the tide came in, we would retreat, keeping the water at waist height, until the water forced us onto the pier or green embankment.

Choice bait was white cracker shrimp, and the area in front of you now (sandbank at low tide – between Wilson’s Wharf & main yacht mole) produced some of the finest stumpnose in the bay. “Stumpies” and grunter would venture onto the sandbanks at high tide in search of cracker shrimp.

Other fish in the channels, which we often netted or caught, were “banana fish” or mullet; both tasty on fresh white bread (including the sardines you never used!!) despite what some may think.

When fishing was boring, fun could be found on the banks in the foreground of this photo (a dried reed / stick with a blob of clay on the end was a great “weapon” to sting the hell out of your mates – use stick to launch clay blob at opponent’s body at high speed).

These were the days that you safely walked kilometres from home to fish and then back again, exploring along the way. We would often explore the edge of the harbour all the way from the dry dock right up to the old north pier, on foot or on BMX (I also had a Raleigh Chopper for a few years).

There were no electronics involved, huge respect for the law and our parents (although we did transgress a little); and we knew our land well. Although Apartheid laws existed at the time and were strictly enforced, we fished with all fishermen (Poobal from the Congella Barracks was a regular as well as Ernest – our maid’s son)”.

Canon 6D, 17-40mm, ISO 100, F11, 1/13 sec shortly after sunrise for sky + another photo before sunrise shot on Bulb Mode setting 121 sec, F14, ISO 100 for land / water – Wilson’s Wharf, Durban – South Africa

I Love Durban 5 Star Durban Celebrate Durban!People’s Weather East Coast Radio Wilson’s WharfPoint Yacht Club Royal Natal Yacht Club
#ilovedurban #pointyachtclub #yachtmole#durbanharbour

— at Wilson’s Wharf.