Durban Nights

Durban Nights

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Columbine Twin Peaks

Columbine Twin Peaks

On March 31, 1829 the barque Columbine was wrecked 1.5 km North of where the present day Cape Columbine Lighthouse stands. The Cape Columbine Lighthouse was commissioned on October 1, 1936.

The Columbine Nature Reserve surrounds Cape Columbine Lighthouse. On the southern side of the lighthouse is Tietie’s Bay. The coastline is well known for its sea life, especially crayfish and abalone.

On 25 February 2014 I witnessed my first sunrise at this beautiful location and at at 06:33 took the accompanying photo a few hundred metres from the Nature Reserve gate.

Holi, Durban 2013

We went to a fairly low-key Holi event on Sunday at Kendra Hall. When chatting to fellow photographer Nirun about this, he reminded me about last year’s hectic event on the Durban Beachfront. I was there and pulled one of my photos out the archives to remind myself of the peaceful and fun chaos that reigned that afternoon. I do hope that ISKCON Durban and the City of Durban repeat this event.

Holi 2013

Boulder’s Bay Surprise

Boulder's Bay Surprise (Large)

 

During our recent trip to Cape Town this was the first morning that we were greeted with lovely clouds and colours. We missed the pink sunset the night before and it was drizzling slightly at around 05:00 the next morning. We still decided to venture out hoping that the weather was a bit different on the other side of the mountain.

Wiki advises as follows: “Boulders Beach is a sheltered beach made up of inlets between granite boulders, from which the name originated. It is located in the Cape Peninsula, near Simon’s Town towards Cape Point, near Cape Town in the Western Cape province of South Africa. It is also commonly known as Boulders Bay [1]. It is a popular tourist stop because of a colony of African Penguins which settled there in 1982. Boulders Beach forms part of the Table Mountain National Park.
Although set in the midst of a residential area, it is one of the few sites where this vulnerable bird (Spheniscus demersus) can be observed at close range, wandering freely in a protected natural environment. From just two breeding pairs in 1982, the penguin colony has grown to about 3,000 birds in recent years. This is partly due to the reduction in commercial pelagic trawling in False Bay, which has increased the supply of pilchards and anchovy, which form part of the penguins’ diet [2].
Bordered mainly by indigenous bush above the high-water mark on the one side, and the clear water of False Bay on the other, the area comprises a number of small sheltered bays, partially enclosed by granite boulders that are 540 million years old.
The most popular recreational spot is Boulders Beach, but the penguins are best viewed from Foxy Beach, where newly constructed boardwalks take visitors to within a few meters of the birds. It is also a popular swimming beach, although people are restricted to beaches adjacent to the penguin colony.”

Tietie’s Delight

Tieties Delight (Large)

 

I heard that Paternoster was great but upon arrival did not see much of the big white rocks that I like shooting. I planned a sunrise shoot the next morning and, not having any time to plan, thought that I would try pot luck and simply drive south, an hour before sunrise, keeping my eyes peeled. After driving for a few kilometres I started to see a number of rocks and then came upon a locked gate to a fenced reserve. After negotiating with the guard and being allowed entry, I raced down to the water’s edge to set-up my tripod. In the two days that followed we discovered the wonders of Tietie’s Bay. PS – I was so excited that morning I said to the guard “I’m so excited I don’t know which way to go” (it looked beautiful all over).

Eastern Food Bazaar – Cape Town

It is really surprising that many Cape Town residents that I speak to have not tried Eastern Food Bazaar.

One sentence: Fresh, cheap, authentic, tasty, spicy Chinese / Indian / Turkish /  food all under one roof!

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